BA in Conflict Analysis and Resolution

Catalog Year: 2017-2018

The world is becoming increasingly connected and the ability to create and maintain cross-cultural connections is more important than ever. As the effects of violence and conflict are felt throughout the global community, we are seeing more and more opportunities for collaboration, problem solving, and peacebuilding in local communities and across international barriers. To prepare our students to make cross-cultural connections, Bachelor's of Arts in Conflict Analysis and Resolution students must demonstrate intermediate level proficiency in a foreign language.

Concentrations

All conflict analysis and resolution majors choose an area of concentration from the following:

  • Building Peace in Divided Societies
  • Global Engagement
  • Political and Social Action
  • Justice and Reconciliation
  • Interpersonal Dynamics
  • Collaborative Leadership

Advising

School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution advisors help students create an interdisciplinary course of study that meets their interests and career goals. All majors are strongly encouraged to meet regularly with an academic advisor from the School who will help students develop and follow a coherent plan of study and complete the degree in a timely manner.

The University Catalog is the authoritative source for information on program requirements and courses. The Schedule of Classes is the authoritative source for information on classes scheduled for this semester. See the Schedule for the most up-to-date information and see Patriot web to register for classes. Requirements may be different for earlier catalog years. See the University Catalog archives.

Degree Requirements

Total credits: 120

Students must fulfill all requirements for bachelor's degrees as stated in Academic Policies including all Mason Core requirements. Students majoring in Conflict Analysis and Resolution must also complete the college-level requirements for foreign language proficiency as well as 51 major requirement credits for the BA degree.

Students pursuing a double major/degree with a program outside of the S-CAR undergraduate program will be expected to fulfill all of the Mason Core and college requirements necessary to complete the second major. Please check with the second major department concerning additional requirements.

Required Core Courses

CONF 101 Conflict and Our World (Mason Core) 3
CONF 210 Theories of Conflict Analysis and Resolution 3
CONF 300 Conflict Resolution Techniques and Practice 3
CONF 301 Research and Inquiry in Conflict Resolution 3
CONF 302 Culture, Identity, and Conflict 3
CONF 320 Interpersonal Conflict Analysis and Resolution 3
CONF 330 Community, Group, and Organizational Conflict Analysis and Resolution 3
CONF 340 Global Conflict Analysis and Resolution (Mason Core) 3
CONF 490 RS: Integration (Mason Core) 3
Total Credits 27

Field Experience

Students can choose to fulfill this requirement through an internship, service learning, study abroad, or independent study.

Students may not be approved for field experience until they have earned at least 30 credits. It is recommended that students complete at least nine credits of conflict coursework before applying for field experience credit. Prior approval by the Director of Field Experience is required for students to receive credit through any field experience options. Students interested in trips with S-CAR can find information here. Students interested in study abroad through the Global Education Office can find information here. Please contact an S-CAR advisor with questions or for information on the opportunities, policies, and procedures for field experience credit.

Select a minimum of three credits from the following: 3
CONF 370
Internship Field Experience  
CONF 375
Special Programs Field Experience  
CONF 385
International Field Experience  
CONF 485
Service Learning Intensive  
CONF 499
Independent Research in Conflict Analysis and Resolution  
Total Credits 3

Skills and Practice

This three credit requirement can be fulfilled by taking:

  1. an additional 3 credits of field experience, OR
  2. a foreign language course at the 250 level or higher, OR
  3. one of the 3 credit courses or three of the 1 credit courses listed below:
Select one of these 3 credit courses: 3
CONF 325
Dialogue and Difference  
CONF 398
Special Topics in Advanced Techniques and Practices  
CONF 425
Mediating Conflict  
Or select three of these 1 credit skills courses:  
CONF 310
Special Topics in Practice  
CONF 314
Advising Seminar for Conflict Majors  
CONF 331
Simulation in Community and Organizational Conflict Resolution  
CONF 341
Simulation in Global Conflict Resolution  
CONF 499
Independent Research in Conflict Analysis and Resolution  
Total Credits 3

Courses may NOT double count for the concentration requirement and the skills and practice requirement.

Concentrations

There are seven concentrations.

Concentrations

  • Concentration in Building Peace in Divided Societies (BPDS)
  • Concentration in Global Engagement (GLBE)
  • Concentration in Political and Social Action (PSA)
  • Concentration in Justice and Reconciliation (JRCN)
  • Concentration in Interpersonal Dynamics (INTD)
  • Concentration in Collaborative Leadership (CLDR)
  • Individualized Concentration (IND)

To fulfill the concentration requirement students select six concentration courses. Four of those six courses must be taken from within their chosen concentration. The remaining two concentration courses may be taken from any of the concentration course lists. Special topics courses relevant to the concentration and/or courses that provide regional expertise can be substituted with departmental approval. Students are encouraged to check special topics courses each semester and think creatively about which courses support learning in their chosen concentration. At least two of the six concentration courses must be CONF courses.  Courses may not double count for the concentration requirement and the skills and practice requirement.

Concentration in Building Peace in Divided Societies (BPDS)

Focuses on how divided societies with a history of conflict seek to transform relationships and situations of violence and injustice. Examines communities and societies that have experienced conflict and how individuals and groups build peace locally and globally.

Select at least four of the six concentration courses from the following: 12
CONF 325
Dialogue and Difference  
CONF 393
Violence: Causes, Dynamics Alternatives  
CONF 435
Building Peace in Divided Societies  
Foundations of Intercultural Communication (Mason Core)  
Globalization and Culture  
Economics of Developing Areas (Mason Core)  
GGS 307
Geographic Approaches on Sustainable Development  
GOVT 342
Diplomacy  
The Civil War and Reconstruction  
Conflict Resolution and Transformation  
Globalization and Social Change (Mason Core)  
Total Credits 12

Concentration in Global Engagement (GLBE)

Focuses on studying the dynamics and impact of global conflict resolution. Examines domestic and international dimensions of security, state-to-state conflict, internal wars, terrorism, migration, negotiation, and diplomacy. Explores what can be done to reduce violent conflict and increase peace and security.

Select at least four of the six concentration courses from the following: 12
CONF 335
Justice and Reconciliation  
CONF 345
Social Dynamics of Terrorism, Security, and Justice  
Law and Justice around the World (Mason Core)  
International Economic Policy  
EVPP 337
Environmental Policy Making in Developing Countries  
GGS 301
Political Geography  
GGS 307
Geographic Approaches on Sustainable Development  
GOVT 322
International Relations Theory  
GOVT 342
Diplomacy  
GOVT 446
International Law and Organization  
Refugee and Internal Displacement (Mason Core)  
Violence and Religion  
Total Credits 12

Concentration in Political and Social Action (PSA)

Focuses on the ways that people organize themselves to effect change in their societies. This concentration explores social action, social organization, social movements, and civil resistance to analyze and investigate the role of constructive conflict.

Select at least four of the six concentration courses from the following: 12
CONF 393
Violence: Causes, Dynamics Alternatives  
CONF 394
Human Rights and Inequality  
Rhetoric of Social Movements and Political Controversy (Mason Core)  
Economic Problems and Public Policies (Mason Core)  
GOVT 301
Public Law and the Judicial Process  
GOVT 364
Public Policy Making  
Social Movements and Community Activism (Mason Core)  
Environmental Justice (Mason Core)  
Social Justice and Human Rights (Mason Core)  
Community Engagement for Social Change (Mason Core)  
Social Movements and Political Protest  
Power, Politics, and Society  
Social Problems and Solutions (Mason Core)  
Total Credits 12

Concentration in Justice and Reconciliation (JRCN)

Focuses on the-relationships between human rights, justice, and conflict resolution. Encompasses a spectrum of coursework including legal dimensions of human rights, trauma, memory, healing, conflict transformation, and forms of restorative justice.

Select four of the six concentration courses from the following: 12
CONF 335
Justice and Reconciliation  
CONF 394
Human Rights and Inequality  
CONF 435
Building Peace in Divided Societies  
Social Inequality, Crime, and Justice  
Crime Victims and Victimization  
Family Law and the Justice System  
Law and Justice (Mason Core)  
Conflict, Trauma and Healing (Mason Core)  
Social Justice and Human Rights (Mason Core)  
Race and Ethnicity in a Changing World  
Social Inequality (Mason Core)  
Total Credits 12

Concentration in Interpersonal Dynamics (INTD)

Focuses on the dynamics of social interaction that lead to interpersonal conflict and the processes and skills that support the transformation of these conflicts. Issues examined include intercultural communication, psychology of groups, family relationships, and other dimensions of human relations.

Select four of the six concentration courses from the following: 12
CONF 325
Dialogue and Difference  
CONF 425
Mediating Conflict  
Relational Communication Theory  
Foundations of Intercultural Communication (Mason Core)  
Interpersonal Communication in the Workplace  
Issues in Family Relationships (Mason Core)  
Social Psychology (Mason Core)  
Applied Cross-Cultural Psychology (Mason Core)  
Science of Well Being  
The Psychology of Working in Groups and Teams  
Marriage, Families, and Intimate Life  
Contemporary Gender Relations  
Total Credits 12

Concentration in Collaborative Leadership (CLDR)

Focuses on improving the capacity of leaders to work with conflict and manage change. Includes topics in conflict transformation, mediation, dialogue, and organizational leadership.

Select four of the six concentration courses from the following: 12
CONF 325
Dialogue and Difference  
Small Group Communication  
Organizational Communication  
GOVT 351
Administration in the Political System  
The Nonprofit Sector (Mason Core)  
Ethics and Leadership  
Leadership in a Changing Environment  
MBUS 301
Managing People and Organizations in a Global Economy  
PRLS 316
Leadership and Outdoor Education  
Industrial and Organizational Psychology  
Psychology of Creativity and Innovation  
Total Credits 12

Individualized Concentration (IND)

Students interested in creating their own concentration can work with an advisor to decide upon a set of at least six courses that form a cohesive theme and will fulfill the requirements of the BA in Conflict Analysis and Resolution. Individualized concentrations must be approved by the Director of the Undergraduate Program

Foreign Language Proficiency

Students must demonstrate intermediate-level proficiency in one foreign language. This requirement may be fulfilled by successfully completing a foreign language course numbered 202 or higher.  Students may also fulfill this requirement by achieving a satisfactory score on a university approved foreign language proficiency test. Students who are already proficient in a second language may be eligible for a waiver of this requirement.

Writing-Intensive Requirement

All Mason students are required to complete at least one course designated as "writing intensive" in their major at the 300-level or above. CONF 302 Culture, Identity, and Conflict has been designated "writing intensive."

Electives

Remaining credits needed to bring the degree total to 120 may be fulfilled with general elective courses. 1,2  

Mason Core

Some Mason Core requirements may already be fulfilled by the major requirements listed above. Students are strongly encouraged to consult their advisors to ensure they fulfill all remaining Mason Core requirements.

Foundation Requirements  
Written Communication (ENGH 101) 3
Oral Communication 3
Quantitative Reasoning 3
Information Technology and Computing 3
Exploration Requirements  
Arts 3
Global Understanding 3
Literature 3
Natural Science 7
Social and Behavioral Sciences 3
Western Civilization/World History 3
Integration Requirements  
Written Communications (ENGH 302) 3
Writing-Intensive 1 3
Synthesis/Capstone 2 3
Total Credits 40